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Gigabyte Z390 AORUS Pro WiFi: Is Midrange AORUS Right For Your Next Build?

 

Blender

Blender is a great test as it is a good representation of real world productivity with image rendering capability on the CPU or GPU. We test both to show how platform changes can give better performance.

Blender shows the difference between test 1 which is CPU based rendering and 2 which is GPU based. The CPU test has a strong showing with Gigabyte taking the win by a very narrow margin, while it loses in the second test but very narrowly to the Maximus Extreme board.

Cinebench R15

Cinebench is all about rendering out images and doing this on the CPU is hard work, and it offers tests for both single and multi-threaded renders along with even an OpenGL GPU based workload.

Cinebench is probably the go-to as of recent as far as testing CPU performance. and much to my dismay as the benchmark can vary from run to run so this definitely takes more runs to get a  good solid average that is comparable. Noting the ICCmax constraint omission and higher Ring ratio on the Gigabyte Z390 AORUS Pro WiFi, it does very well edging out the competition on the multi-core test. This is at least in part due to its ability to hold turbo infinitely. The Gigabyte board barely falters in the single-core test to the MSI but steadily bests the Maximus Extreme. the OpenGL test the Gigabyte takes home as well, while it may be by a slim margin, it still takes it.

Handbrake

Handbrake is a popular open source video transcoder available free to anyone. We test transcoding a large video file from X264 MKV to MP4

Handbrake is a good test for those looking at video encoding which is becoming a much more common task as more people are now playing with digital video. Handbrake also happens to be an AVX load which of course means torture for a CPU and VRM. This is where we discovered that Gigabyte by default does NOT run any sort of AVX offset whereas the MSI and ASUS boards did run a -2 offset. This should not be an issue as long as you plan cooling properly, but should you happen to change your MCE setting to enable like I tried just to see what kind of limits were set I found that the Gigabyte board sets 5GHz static with NO AVX offset which led to it pushing upwards of 1.45VCore with 5GHz AVX speeds and after a few minutes voltage had crept into 1.5V+ territory where I killed the test.
I spoke to Gigabyte about the lack of AVX offset and it was explained that you have the option add AVX offset, so consumers beware as this could lead to thermal runaway very quickly.

7-Zip

7-Zip is a free open source file compression utility and also a good way to show your PC’s capability to perform compression tasks.

The 7Zip benchmark shows the compression capabilities of the platform. Gigabyte and ASUS boards were a dead heat with the average being exactly the same while MSI fell a bit behind here.

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