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Thursday , 29 October 2020

ASUS Strix GTX 950 DC2OC, Strix Goes Mainstream!

Synthetic Benchmarks

Unigine Heaven

Heaven Benchmark is a GPU-intensive benchmark that hammers graphics cards to the limits. This powerful tool can be effectively used to determine the stability of a GPU under extremely stressful conditions, as well as check the cooling system’s potential under maximum heat output. It provides completely unbiased results and generates true, in-game rendering workloads across all platforms.

Heaven

Heaven

We ran Unigine Heaven 4.0 at the same settings we always use and the ASUS Strix GTX 950 DC2OC turned in a respectable 30.9 FPS and the benchmark ran without stuttering and to our eyes we saw no pauses, micro-stutters or other indications the video card was having problems.

Settings for Unigine Heaven

Unigine Heaven Settings

1920 x 1080
  • Preset: Custom
  • Quality: Ultra
  • Tesselation: Extreme
  • Stereo 3D: Disabled
  • Multi Monitor: Disabled
  • Anti Aliasing: 8x
  • Full Screen: On
  • Resolution: Custom

3DMark Testing

Fire Strike

Fire Strike is a DirectX 11 showcase benchmark designed for today’s high-performance gaming PCs. It is our most ambitious and technical benchmark ever, featuring real-time graphics rendered with detail and complexity far beyond what is found in other benchmarks and games today.

FireStrike

FireStrike

Considering the hardware and the price point of the ASUS Strix GTX 950 DC2OC it’s not running that far behind the GTX 960 pack and doing extremely well for a upper tier mainstream offering.

3DMark Skydiver

3DMark Sky Diver is a DirectX 11 benchmark for gaming laptops and mid-range PCs. Use 3DMark Sky Diver to benchmark systems with mainstream graphics cards, mobile GPUs, or integrated graphics.

 

Skydiver

Skydiver

The ASUS Strix GTX 950 DC2OC scored as well as the EVGA GTX 950 so we know we are in the sweet spot for GTX 950 performance and both turned out respectable scores of 23,000+ and GTX 950 is looking like one of the better mainstream offerings we’ve seen.

Check Also

Undervolting the RTX 3080 and the RTX3090

What if you could find a way to lower both the temperature and the power consumption of your new GPU while still getting almost the same performance? Well, there is. It is called undervolting. Since the RTX 3080 and RTX 3090 came out there has been a lot of talk about undervolting them to get better thermals while still getting kick-ass performance and of course I decided I wanted to try it out myself. In the following pages you can both read on how to do it yourself but also get an idea how it will affect both the performance but also the thermals (and noise level).

Gigabyte RTX 3090 Eagle OC

Gigabyte RTX 3090 Eagle OC 24GB

At the same time Nvidia released the excellent RTX 3080 they also released the RTX 3090, a successor to both the RTX 2080 Ti and the Titan RTX. While the RTX 3080 comes with 16 GB VRAM, Nvidia has put a whopping 24 GB VRAM on the RTX 3090. In addition the RTX 3090 comes with 10496 CUDA cores (up from 8704 for the RTX 3080), 82 Streaming Multiprocessors, a wider memory interface and almost 1 TB/s in memory bandwith. Today I am looking at the Gigabyte RTX 3090 Eagle OC 24 GB. As the name implies it comes with a (minor) overclock. How much faster is it than the Gigabyte RTX 3080 Eagle OC? Is it worth the extra money? Read on to to get the answers on these and many other questions.

2 comments

  1. Nice review! any chance you do another with 2x 950’s on SLI and how they perform compared with a single 970 or even 980?

    keep the good work!

    • No Matter what you do when running the GTX 950 in SLI the array of Video Cards wil still be limited to 2GB of memory on the first card so they aren’t going to compare well to a card with 4GB of memory video card. I did run SLI with a couple of 950’s and two scored 12k on 3DMark Skydiver if that’s any help. Jump the resolution up to 1440p and the SLI arrangement just won’t handle it being limited to 2 GB of memory.

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