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Saturday , 24 October 2020

Gigabyte AORUS M.2 NVMe Gen4 SSD / 1TB

Usually when new consoles are being discussed the focus is on the CPU and GPU. With the PS5 and the Xbox One Series X one more component has gotten a lot of attention: the SSD. Both come with super high-speed SSD’s, especially the PS5 with a top speed of 5000 MB/s, and a lot of buzz have been about these high-speed SSD’s making it possible to create game-experiences that wasn’t really possible with the older consoles and their HDD’s.

What about the PC then? SSD’s isn’t something new but up until recently the max speed you would get out of a fast NVMe-drive would be around 3500 MB/s. That is becasse of the limitations of PCI-E 3.0. With the release of the AMD X570-chipset from AMD came an interesting storage update: support for PCI-E 4.0. This allows us to get M.2-SSD’s with far higher top speed than today.

Today I am reviewing one of those new SSD’s – the Gigabyte AORUS M.2 NVMe Gen4 SSD. With a stated theoretical max speed of  up to 5000 MB/s sequential read speed and up to 4400 MB/s sequential write speed this is a really fast SSD that rivals the one in the PS5.

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What if you could find a way to lower both the temperature and the power consumption of your new GPU while still getting almost the same performance? Well, there is. It is called undervolting. Since the RTX 3080 and RTX 3090 came out there has been a lot of talk about undervolting them to get better thermals while still getting kick-ass performance and of course I decided I wanted to try it out myself. In the following pages you can both read on how to do it yourself but also get an idea how it will affect both the performance but also the thermals (and noise level).

Nvidia DLSS 2.0 and the Nvidia RTX2060-Max Q

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